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Saturday 24th August 2019

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WebMD Health

First Death Reported as Cases Linked to Vaping Rise

The CDC reports the first death from severe lung injuries related to vaping. The adult from Illinois is among 193 potential cases in 22 states of people hospitalized for lung injuries in recent weeks.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Treated for Pancreatic Cancer

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has just finished treatment for pancreatic cancer, the U.S. Supreme Court announced Friday.

Your Dog May Be Leading You to a Healthier Heart

Researchers found that compared with people who had no pets, dog owners tended to have fewer risk factors for heart disease: They got more exercise, and had healthier diets and lower blood sugar levels.

A Kid-Friendly Emergency Room Saves Lives

The risk of death was three times lower for those treated at ERs with greater levels of pediatric readiness.

1 in 8 Teen Girls Has Faced 'Reproductive Coercion'

Reproductive coercion is a form of abuse in which a girl or woman is pressured into pregnancy. From a male partner threatening to leave if his female partner refuses to have his baby, to poking holes in condoms before sex, the coercion can take shape in a variety of ways.

Just One Pill for All Your Heart Health Needs? It's On the Way

The "polypill" reduced the risk of life-threatening heart health problems by more than one-third during a five-year period in a group of more than 3,400 people aged 50 to 75.

Teen Recovering From Serious Vaping-Related Illness

A Texas teen spent 10 days in a coma fighting what doctors say was a vaping-related lung illness that almost took his life.

CDC Warns of 'Super' Salmonella in Beef, Cheese

First seen in 2017, this bacterial strain has already caused 255 Americans in 32 states to become ill, and many more cases are expected.

Cases of Lung Injury Tied to Vaping Keep Rising

Late Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its tally of such cases to 153, spread across 16 states. These cases have emerged in a relatively short timeframe -- from June 28 through Aug. 20, the agency said in a statement.

CBD Is the Rage, But More Science Needed on Safety, Effectiveness

The review found that limited regulation of CBD products is a concern for health care providers.

Microplastics in Drinking Water Not a Health Risk

However the World Health Organization also noted that more research is needed into how microplastics may impact human health and the environment, the Associated Press reported.

TB Cases Drop Among the Young, But Racial Disparities Persist

Rates among all other racial/ethnic groups were at least 14 times higher than among whites.

Even a Little Exercise Means a Lot for Life Span

The Norwegian researchers also found that too much sitting was associated with a higher risk of early death.

No Such Thing As Crazy Cat Ladies: Study

A new study says that people who have lots of cats aren't more likely to be anxious, depressed or lonely, CNN reporte

Aging Narrows Gender Gap in Flu Vaccine Response

Here's some bad news for older women during flu season: Aging reduces the stronger immune response that women typically have to vaccination, a new study finds.

More Antibiotics, Higher Odds for Colon Cancer?

Taking certain antibiotics -- especially multiple times or for long courses -- may put you at risk for colon cancer, a large new study suggests.

Brutal Ragweed Season Forecast

People who have allergies may be in for a rough ragweed season this summer and fall, thanks to hotter and wetter weather nationwide.

CBP Won't Vaccinate Migrants Against Flu

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency's announcement that it won't vaccinate migrants is being slammed by public health experts.

Women's Mid-Life Stress Might Affect Memory

Stressful experiences in middle age are associated with greater memory loss among women later in life, a new study says.

'Red Flag' Laws May Be Stopping Some Mass Shootings

"Red flag" laws that allow police to take guns away from people who've threatened mass shootings are designed to save lives, but do they?

Could Dirty Air Spur a Rise in Mental Illness?

As air quality declines, the prevalence of mental health conditions may rise, a large, new study suggests.

State's Legal Moves Cause Mixed Messages on Toxic Air

In recent weeks, state officials have been moving swiftly to make legal agreements with Sterigenics that, in some cases, have bypassed public input.

It Takes Years for Heart to Recover from Smoking

Experts have long thought that an ex-smoker's risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure or death from heart disease returns to normal within five years.

Task Force Updates Breast Cancer Recommendations

New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) may help clarify who can benefit most from a risk assessment test. Now, if a woman has a high risk, the task force is recommending that she see a genetic counselor and possibly be tested for the BRCA mutations.

Vaping Raises Heart and Lung Concerns

The small study of healthy young adults discovered that even e-cigarettes without nicotine caused a short-lived drop in blood vessel function.

City Parks Are a Mood Booster

Large regional parks with lots of tree cover and vegetation conferred the biggest happiness lift, while paved urban plazas offered the least benefit. Smaller neighborhood parks fell somewhere in the middle.

Children Make You Happier -- Once They've Left Home

Having children can make you happier, but only when you're older and if your children have moved out, a new study finds.

Georgia Residents Demand State Act on Toxic Air

Residents at a community meeting expressed displeasure with state and federal officials who said working with the company on a voluntary basis would be most effective.

Heart Experts Support Use of Prescription Fish Oil

While the AHA comes out in favor of prescription fish oil supplements, it does not do the same for over-the-counter supplements.

Could Fluoride Be Bad for Baby During Pregnancy?

Two out of every three U.S. residents now live in an area with fluoridated water, compared with 38% of Canadians and 3%  of Europeans, the researchers said in background notes.

Weaver Frozen Chicken Patties Recalled

About 39,000 pounds of Weaver brand chicken patty products have been recalled by Tyson Foods Inc. due to possible contamination with foreign matter.

Plague Concerns Close Parts of Wildlife Refuge

Some areas of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge near Denver remain closed due to plague-infected prairie dogs.

A Fatty Meal Might Affect How You Absorb CBD

Compared with fasting, the amount of CBD in the body was four times higher after the high-fat meal and the maximum amount in the blood was 14 times higher, the findings showed.

School Shootings and Lockdowns: How do Kids Cope?

School shootings have become much more common occurrences in the 21st century. What affect are these events -- and the drills designed to protect kids from them -- having on America's children?

Are You an 'Extreme Early Bird'?

In advanced sleep phase, your body clock (circadian rhythm) is on a schedule hours earlier than most other people's. You have premature release of the sleep hormone melatonin and shift in body temperature.

Trans Students More at Risk of Mental Health Ills

About 78% of the students met criteria for one or more mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, self-injury and suicide risk, the survey found.

Migraine Meds Recalled for Bacteria Risk

The bacteria, from the genus pseudomonas and the genus burkholderia, can enter the bloodstream and cause serious, life-threatening infections.

Severe Lung Injury After Vaping Reported

Four cases of severe lung injury possibly linked with vaping in Minnesota are similar to dozens of cases in Wisconsin and Illinois.

Heart Attack Rates Higher Near Fast-Food Clusters

For every additional fast-food outlet in a neighborhood, there were four additional heart attacks per 100,000 people each year, according to the report.

FDA Approves Drug for Most Deadly Form of TB

The FDA approval sprang from a groundbreaking trial of 107 patients in South Africa who had been diagnosed with XDR-TB. Six months after treatment, 89% of the patients were cured, which is far higher than typical success rates for treatment of this often lethal strain of TB

FDA Proposes Graphic Warning Labels For Cigarettes

Cigarette packs would have to carry very large warning labels that would feature color photos that graphically illustrate the damage smoking can cause. It would be the most significant change to cigarette labels in more than 35 years.

Younger Patients Shunning Blood Pressure Meds

The researchers found that 23.5% of the patients stopped taking the drugs within the first nine months. And of those who kept using the medications, 40% had "low adherence" -- taking the prescribed amount less than 80% of the time.

Local Air Testing for Toxic Gas Closer to Reality

Meanwhile, the state Environmental Protection Division this week revealed results of an initial sample test for ethylene oxide at its South DeKalb monitoring station.

Toxic Algae Kills Dogs Across the Country

The killer is blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, that can be found in fresh or salt water and contain toxins that can be fatal to dogs within minutes, hours, or days of exposure.

Here's How Too Much Social Media Can Harm Girls

Among girls, the more often they used social media, the more psychological distress they suffered, the findings suggested.

Speed Stroke Recovery With Exercise

Mixed aerobic exercise provided the greatest improvement, followed by walking, cycling and recumbent stepping -- a machine that allows stepping while in a seated position.

Scientists Creating Gene Map of Human 'Microbiome'

The research could reveal links between microbiome genes and human disease, and lead to development of precision treatments, they said.

Israeli Flight Attendant Dies of Measles

Like many people her age worldwide, Amitai was vaccinated against measles as a child but received only one dose of the vaccine, CNN reported.

New Drugs Cured 2 Ebola Patients: Doctors

Earlier this week, preliminary results from two trials in Congo suggested that the two drugs significantly reduced the risk of death from Ebola.

Is a Chlamydia Vaccine on the Horizon?

All of the women who received the vaccine produced antibodies to chlamydia, but one of the vaccines, called CTH522:CAF01, produced nearly six times more antibodies than the other vaccine, the investigators found.

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