FAQ
Log In
Sunday 21st April 2019

News

WebMD Health

'Superbugs' Hang Out on Hospital Patients

In the study, researchers tested 399 hospital patients and found that 14% had superbugs on their hands or nostrils right after admission. Superbugs were also found on items commonly touched by patients, such as the nurse call button, in nearly one-third of tests.

Heart Patients Pay the Price When Nearby Pharmacy Closes

Nearly 24% of patients whose pharmacies closed failed to refill their statin prescription during 12 months of follow-up, compared with nearly 13%  of those whose pharmacies remained open, the findings showed.

Girls' Online Sex Experience May Spur Risk Offline

In addition, girls who had been mistreated prior to the study were more likely to experience physical violence and HIV risk.

Listeria Outbreak Linked to Deli Meats in 4 States

The illnesses in the outbreak, which first began more than two years ago, have been reported in Michigan, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

Buyer Beware When Purchasing Medical Test Strips

Pre-owned test strips or test strips not authorized for sale in the United States may be sold online through Amazon, eBay and Craigslist, or directly from the seller, according to the FDA.

Even 'Weekend Warriors' Get a Boost To Life Span

The researchers classified them as "weekend warriors" if they exercised only one or two days a week, or as regularly active folks who spread their exercise out over the week.

Why a Knee Replacement Can Go Bad

Knee replacement is a common procedure most often used to treat pain and disability caused by osteoarthritis. Deep infection is a rare but serious complication that occurs in about 1% of knee replacement patients.

Replace Red Meat With Plant Protein for Heart Health

Your heart will thank you if you replace red meat with healthy plant proteins. Doing so will lower your odds for heart disease, according to a new study.

Scientists Generate 'Activity' in Dead Pig Brain

The cells of the brain remained viable six hours later, compared with other brains not preserved using the newly developed process, the researchers reported.

Gene Therapy Restores Immunity for ‘Bubble Boys’

A team of scientists say they have treated 10 "Bubble Boy' babies born with the disease called X-linked combined severe immunodeficiency, or SCID-X1, using a combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy.

More TV, Tablets, More Attention Issues at Age 5

Compared with their peers who spent no more than a half-hour in front of a screen each day, 5-year-olds who logged over two hours were six times more likely to have "clinically significant" attention issues.

Gulf War Legacy: Higher Risk of Birth Defects

Rates of major birth defects were similar for children of deployed and non-deployed veterans. And there was no difference in major birth defects among children whose mothers were or weren't deployed.

C-Section Infection Risk Higher for Moms on Medicaid: Study

Surgical site infections occurred in 0.75% of the deliveries covered by Medicaid and 0.63% of those covered by private insurance. In other words, women covered by Medicaid had a 1.4-fold higher risk, the researchers reported.

Do American Adults Drink Too Much? Study Says Yes

Binge-drinking -- four or more drinks in a two-hour period for women and five or more for men --  is typical behavior for 7% of adults aged 35 to 44 and 10% of adults aged 45 to 54, according to the poll.

Two Lives Saved in Rare 'Paired' Liver Donation

Living liver donation carries more risks than a living kidney donation, and it comes with a 0.3% donor risk of death and a 30% risk of complications following an adult-to-adult donation with the larger right liver lobe.

Recall: Some Chewy Chips Ahoy After Baking Mishap

Only 13-ounce packages of Chewy Chips Ahoy, which are sold nationwide, are part of the recall.

Raw Tuna Linked to Salmonella Outbreak

A salmonella outbreak linked to frozen, raw ground tuna from Jensen Tuna has sickened 13 people in seven states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream Recall

Certain batches of Ben & Jerry's Coconut Seven Layer Bar bulk and Ben & Jerry's Chunky Monkey pints may contain undeclared tree nuts that could put people with an allergy or severe sensitivity to tree nuts at risk for a life-threatening allergic reaction.

Common Sleep Myths Endanger Public Health

One of the top myths was the claim of some people who insist they can get by on five hours of sleep a night.

FDA Halts All Sales of Vaginal Mesh Products

The companies will have 10 days to submit plans to withdraw these products from the market, the FDA said. Most pelvic mesh products have already been taken off the market, according to the Associated Press.

A Media Avalanche is Burying Our Attention Spans

The study feeds into an ongoing debate about the effects the electronic revolution of the past 3 decades has had on how our brains work.

Your Life Span May Be Foretold in Your Heart Beats

A gradual rise in heart rate could mean trouble ahead for your heart health.

Hot-Car Deaths Hit Record High in 2018

With another hot summer approaching, the safety council has issued free online training. The course, called "Children in Hot Cars," explains how distraction and other factors can lead to death in overheated vehicles.

Common Diabetes Drug May Also Help Kidneys, Heart

Those who took Invokana had a 30% lower risk of developing kidney failure, a 30% lower risk of dying from kidney failure or heart disease, the researchers reported.

Many Dying Cancer Patients Try Useless Treatments

A study of just over 100,000 patients in the United States found that the urge to undergo ultimately fruitless cancer treatment "is not a rare phenomenon."

Israeli Team Announces First 3D-Printed Heart Using Human Cells

The printer-generated heart is only about a third the size of an actual human heart -- and it doesn't actually work.

Inactive Lifestyle Begins as Early as Age 7: Study

Among children and teens, parental support for an active lifestyle helped increase activity. For teens, less time in front of the television was associated with regular activity.

Terminally Ill in New Jersey May Soon End Lives

Before a prescription is given, a psychiatrist or psychologist must confirm that the patient has the mental capacity to make the decision to end his or her life.

Celebrity 'Fat-Shaming' Affects All Women: Study

The impact of fat-shaming may be far-reaching because nearly three-quarters of Americans are overweight or obese, according to the latest information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Is a New Remedy for Body Odor on the Horizon?

The researchers took samples of the study participants' underarm bacteria and caused small wounds in the area. Participants were asked if they detected a difference in scent between their left and right armpit and, if so, which smelled better.

Weighted Blankets: From Fad to Mainstream

In 2018, experts estimated that a half-dozen or so companies were producing weighted blankets. By the spring of 2019, the list has grown past two dozen.

'Added Sugars' Label on Foods May Save Many Lives

Added sugars account for more than 15% of Americans' total daily calories, exceeding the recommended level of less than 10%, the researchers said in background notes.

CPAP Brings Longer Life for Those With Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea isn't just an annoyance: It's also been tied to higher risks for heart disease, heart failure and stroke.

Don't Brand Teen Sexting as Child Porn: Experts

A recent study of Pennsylvania high school students found that 29% were "engaged in consensual sexting."

Cut Melon From Major Stores May Carry Salmonella

The outbreak has so far involved 93 cases of Salmonella Carrau illness, including 23 cases so severe the patients required hospitalization, although no deaths have been reported, the FDA said in a statement.

Kids' ER Trips for Swallowed Objects Nearly Double

Between 1995 and 2015, an estimated 800,000 kids under age 6 were treated after swallowing foreign objects. Coins are the main culprit, followed by jewelry, batteries and toy parts. new research has found.

Could Treating Gut Bacteria Help Autism Symptoms?

All the children in the study had severe digestive issues, so once they were more comfortable perhaps they were better able to focus and learn. Healthier microorganisms in the gut also may send chemicals to the brain that help children learn and make connections.

Foul Ball: More Kids Having 'Tommy John' Surgery

The number of teens getting UCLs rebuilt grew from fewer than a dozen a year in the early 1990s to more than 40 by 2010. By 2011, more than half of Tommy John surgeries were done on kids ages 15 to 19.

Just A Little More Exercise Adds Years to Life

Increasing their activity benefited both men and women, in all age groups, and at all fitness levels, the researchers said.

Hospital Privacy Curtains Attract Some Scary Germs

Drug-resistant germs from hospital patients routinely contaminate their privacy curtains, study authors wrote. They often survive and have the potential to transfer to other surfaces and patients.

Many Secretly Use Alternative Meds For Cancer

The researchers found that herbal supplements were the most common complementary and alternative therapy used by cancer patients. That’s a concern, they said, because herbal products can interfere with traditional cancer treatments, reducing their effectiveness.

NASA Twins Study: Body Changes Over Time in Space

Brothers Scott and Mark Kelly were 51 in March 2015, when Scott began his fourth and longest space mission — commanding the International Space Station (ISS) for 340 days, which set an American record.

Science Says: Smiling Helps You Get Happy

The researchers' conclusion: Facial expressions do have a small effect on feelings: Smiling makes people feel happier, scowling makes them feel angrier, and frowning makes them feel sadder.

Grief, Divorce Can Seriously Tax the Heart

The findings do not prove that stress disorders actually triggered heart complications, experts said. But there are reasons to believe they contributed, according to Simon Bacon, author of an editorial published with the study.

CDC: Americans Are Dying From Kratom Overdoses

Besides 91 deaths in which kratom use was at least a factor, victims in 61 other fatal drug overdoses were found to have kratom in their bloodstreams, the CDC said.

Study: Chemo Drug Shortages Don't Affect Care

Nationwide, the number of prescription drug shortages rose from 71 in 2005 to 255 in 2011. Shortages of cancer drugs more than doubled during that time.

Is Your Smartphone Making You Fat?

Researchers believe the findings suggest a link between multitasking and obesity risk -- the connection being the part of the brain that responds to temptation.

Many Misdiagnosed With MS

"I've seen patients suffering side effects from the medication they were taking for a disease they didn't have," said study leader Dr. Marwa Kaisey. “Meanwhile, they weren't getting treatment for what they did have.”

Blame Game on Insulin Costs Leaves Patients Behind

During Wednesday’s House subcommittee hearing on insulin price hikes, drug makers and benefits managers pointed fingers at each other for the last decade’s 300% price increase, frustrating congressional representatives.

Measles Outbreak: What You Should Know

Measles cases have been skyrocketing in the U.S. this year, according to the CDC. Learn why it’s happening and how to protect your family from this potentially deadly disease.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based web development for the healthcare sector
© Mayden Foundation 2019