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Monday 24th October 2016

300 staff face redundancy at NHS Direct

7th March 2013

Job cuts are looming at NHS Direct, it has been revealed.


The organisation is looking to halve its back-office costs in a process that could see more than 300 whole time equivalent staff redundant.

It comes as NHS Direct’s contract to provide the 0845 nurse-led health advice line ends in April.

The new urgent care number NHS 111 is supposed to go-live nationwide in the coming weeks with NHS Direct having won contracts to provide NHS 111 for about one third of England’s population.

NHS Direct expects to answer around six million NHS 111 calls annually, compared to 4.5m 0845 calls, but with NHS 111 calls answered by non-clinical staff, it requires changes in staff numbers and a different skill mix.

It will also reduce the number of its sites nationwide from 30 to 12.

The number of whole time equivalent front line staff will fall from 1060 to 750-800, though NHS Direct expects around 200 of these staff to transfer to other NHS 111 providers, while nurse numbers will be cut from 450 whole time equivalent to 265, with around 85 nurses expected to transfer to other NHS 111 providers.

Support and managerial staff numbers are being reduced from 435 whole time equivalent to 270.


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Thursday 7th March 2013 @ 13:17

How can it be possible to reduce back office staff by half when it is only back office staff, non-clinical staff, working for the system.

This system was trialled in my county, and not many people understood it.

How can you have 50% fewer staff from one third of the sites as before taking a third more calls?

It does not say who is to actually run the system, but it's bound to be someone like Harmoni.

It's another NHS disaster waiting to happen.

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