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Wednesday 26th October 2016

Active children link to pregnancy

23rd November 2007

A study conducted by researchers at Bristol University has shown that women who exercise whilst they are pregnant are more likely to have active children.


The study, as reported in the British Medical Journal. also showed that children who were born during the autumn months tended to take more exercise.

The team looked at 5,500 11 to 12-year-olds. They put together information about the childrens' levels of activity over a period of at least three days. The results were then analysed against different factors, one of which included the amount of exercise taken by their mothers when they were pregnant.

The offspring of women who "took part in regular brisk walking and swimming while pregnant" were shown to be 3-4% more active.

The time of year in which the children were born also appeared to have a "marginal impact". The team said that children born during the autumn months could be drawn towards sporting activities because they are good at them, due to the fact they are more likely to be the "most developed in their school year".

The research team also suggested that mothers who exercised regularly while pregnant were likely to carry on exercising once they had given birth. The team said that this would encourage their children to follow their example and exercise as well.

Lead researcher Calum Mattocks said: "The early pre-school years are so important. It seems if they see their parents doing regular exercise this will have a positive impact."

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