FAQ
Log In
Sunday 4th December 2016
News
 › 
 › 

Advance in heart surgery

11th September 2007

Patients could be helped by new keyhole heart surgery, which has been performed for the "first time" in the UK.

heart surgery

It means that thousands more patients may be able to have this faster and safer operation rather than open heart surgery.

Surgeons - working at King's College London as part of a clinical trial - have used the technique in order to place a replacement valve in the hearts of two "high risk" patients.

Around 18,000 people have heart surgery annually, in order to combat aortic valve stenosis. This condition occurs when the heart valve narrows and is common in the elderly.

Open heart surgery involves a patient's chest being opened and the heart stopped in order to insert a new valve. It is a serious and lengthy operation, which has not been performed on frail patients due to the risks involved.

Earlier in 2007, surgeons at Glenfield Hospital in Leicester were "the first in the UK" to insert a new heart valve using non-invasive techniques.

Keyhole surgeries are a better option for weak patients, because they take less time and anaesthetic and have a shorter recovery period.

Mr Olaf Wendler, who worked in the King's College team, said: "These new minimally-invasive procedures could potentially revolutionise treatment for patients who suffer from this condition."

He said he thought 4,000 to 5,000 patients could benefit from the surgery if the new technique was used by surgeons in the UK.

Share this page

Comments

There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!


Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based applications for healthcare
© Mayden Foundation 2016