Log In
Friday 28th October 2016

Artificial vein breakthrough

13th March 2007

Hopes are high this week for a new plastic vein that could revolutionise the treatment of people with peripheral arterial diseases.

The revolutionary artificial vein, which was invented by three NHS doctors, could offer hope to millions of people suffering with clogged arteries. It has shown a 100% success rate in the first six months of its clinical trials on humans and is now being developed for use in bypass operations.

Until recently it was assumed that blood flowed in a straight line and synthetic veins were created to be smooth on the inside so as not to impede what was thought to be the natural flow of blood. However, it has since been found that blood corkscrews as it flows and this new artificial vein is revolutionary in that it mimics the naturally occurring spiral laminar flow (SLF) of blood in healthy human arteries.  It is also unique in that it actually encourages blood to twist as it moves through the vein.  Because of this spiraling action the synthetic vein suffers less friction and as a result has double the lifespan of a traditional implant.

One of the inventors, Professor Stonebridge of Tayside Flow Technologies said, “One would have expected some of the bypass grafts [artificial veins] in the trials to have failed, but none have. They are all still going which is remarkable.?


Share this page


There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!

Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Article Information

Title: Artificial vein breakthrough
Article Id: 2227
Date Added: 13th Mar 2007

Recent Related Articles

Zika mosquito eggs found in UK

September heatwave to hit the UK

Poverty costing UK £78bn a year


Add to scrapbook
Show Comments
Add comment
Find all related articles


Mayden - Innovative cloud-based web development for the healthcare sector
© Mayden Foundation 2016