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Wednesday 26th October 2016

Asthma risk linked to diet

3rd June 2010

New research has suggested that children who eat a Mediterranean diet have a lower risk of developing asthma.


However, analysis of 50,000 children from 20 different countries found that eating three or more burgers a week, which is linked to other unhealthy eating habits, could be a higher risk.

Writing in the journal Thorax, the research team said eating fruit, vegetables and fish appeared to protect against asthma.

In the study, researchers looked at the eating habits of children in wealthy and poor countries between 1995 and 2000 and questioned parents about their child’s diets and history of asthma.

There was variation, dependent on where the family lived, with vegetables and fruit protective in poor countries and burger consumption a greater risk in wealthier states.

However, the authors suggest that asthma may be a collection of symptoms rather than a single condition, and different things may trigger it in different parts of the world.

Author Dr Gabriele Nagel said: “This gives us more understanding of how asthma affects different people, and its effects in developing as well as developed countries.”

Asthma UK said the paper provided an understanding of how asthma and diet are connected but warned that a child’s weight can be a significant influence.

Spokeswoman Dr Elaine Vickers said: "Previous studies have shown that a Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruit and vegetables can help to reduce a child's risk of developing asthma symptoms.

"Our advice to parents is therefore to ensure that children eat a healthy, balanced diet and also get plenty of exercise."


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