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Tuesday 25th October 2016

Autistic children vulnerable to bullying

3rd April 2013

A survey by the Anti-Bullying Alliance has discovered that over 97% of parents who had an autistic child though they were "more vulnerable" to being bullied at school.


The research, which was carried out as an online poll, had responses from more than 200 parents of autistic children.

The poll showed over 70% of parents believed their child's autism meant their fellow pupils acted "negatively" towards them. 

Luke Roberts, senior development officer for bullying and equalities at the alliance, said: "The key issue is to give children with autism organised and structured play – for example, with activity supervisors or sports coaches, so that there are clear rules and boundaries."

"That would definitely help to reduce the amount of bullying that happens, because it takes away some of the ambiguity of what’s happening and gives children with autism more certainty." 

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Luccinda Anderson

Sunday 7th April 2013 @ 4:39

It often appears that kids who are "different" are targeted for bullying. Sometimes it's a child's appearance, behaviour, or financial or family situation that others perceive as "different". However, this bullying can be prevented. We're living in advanced technology right now, all parents have to do is to find it useful; such as mobile-phones. I would like to share this safety service I'm using in order to provide proper protection for my kids. It is called the Panic Button service. Their goal is to help their subscribers whether it's an emergency or just a simple problem that can be solved through phone. I am one of their subscribers and I'm able to prove it myself that it's very useful most especially for my kids. I highly recommend this app.

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