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Bed bug infestations rise

15th September 2009

According to new research, the number of bed bug infestations in London and the Midlands has substantially increased.

Sleeping

Council statistics revealed that infestation rates have tripled over the last decade. The figures were obtained by the company Bed Bugs Limited with a Freedom of Information request.

Bed bugs nest in mattresses and furniture, usually emerging at night to suck the blood of a host creature. They are a rusty colour and are most commonly found in densely populated areas.

The bugs can be transferred from one place to another on clothes, furniture and belongings. It is also thought that they can be picked up on buses and trains, and brought home, where they breed and spread.

According to microbiologist David Cain: "If exposed, anyone can bring them home and quickly have a problem, as they breed at a phenomenal rate."

A person who has been bitten by a bedbug can develop a swollen bite that itches, although the bugs do not transmit diseases.

Areas of bed bug infestation have been observed radiating out from British airports. It is believed that travellers are bringing the bugs back into the UK from countries where the bed bug problem has not been tackled.

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Article Information

Title: Bed bug infestations rise
Author: Jess Laurence
Article Id: 12642
Date Added: 15th Sep 2009

Sources

BBC News

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