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Sunday 23rd October 2016

BMA rejects new regulation

15th November 2006

04092006_consulting_room1.jpgGovernment proposals to alter how doctors are regulated have been rejected by the British Medical Association.

The BMA has put forward a number of objections to the suggestions in chief medical officer Liam Donaldson’s report Good Doctors, Safer Patients.

In particular it opposed moves to lower the proof needed to strike off a doctor. This would mean reaching the civil court standard of ‘balance of probability’ instead of the current criminal standard of ‘beyond all reasonable doubt’.

But the General Medical Council has already announced its intention to adopt this recommendation.

Other proposals that prompted opposition included moving responsibility for undergraduate medical education from the GMC to the Postgraduate Medical Education and Training Board.

The BMA did welcome some of the recommendations, including moves to support poorly performing doctors. Despite agreeing with the sentiment of the report, but disagreed with the suggested action.

The BMA wants to see an independent tribunal separate from the GMC to carry out the adjudication process in serious fitness to practise cases. The association now wants to discuss its proposals with the government.

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Dennis Morrod

Thursday 11th June 2009 @ 6:48

Ah yes - the BMA objects... It doesn't matter what is best for the patient (just try getting a doctor into court) as long as the BMA can - object. And yes, it is criminal - 10,000 men dying prematurely each year from - the most easy of all cancers to treat (apparently) Prostate Cancer.

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