FAQ
Log In
Sunday 4th December 2016
News
 › 
 › 

Breast cancer lifespan cheer

12th June 2008

A new audit of women with breast cancer in the UK has revealed the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages.

breastcancer

Figures from the NHS Screening Programme audit have shown that women with early stage breast cancer revealed by screening are likely to live as long as someone who has never had the disease.

It found that six out of ten women diagnosed after screening and treated had the same survival rates as the general population.

The screening scheme is set to be extended by 2012 and Professor Julietta Patnick, who runs the NHS Breast Screening Programme, believes that will involve more women and increase the number found early with the condition.

She said: "Huge strides have been made over the past two decades, and more women than ever before are surviving breast cancer, many of whom have benefited from early detection."

In 61% of cases of cancer detected following a mammogram, the patient was given an "excellent" or "good" prognosis, with women predicted to have the same lifespan as women who have never had cancer. However, two out of three breast cancers are not detected by screening, and these are not covered by the audit results.

Mr Martin Lee, the President of the Association of Breast Surgery, said it was vital that women were aware of the survival rates for breast cancers detected early.

Cancer Research UK said results from the audit demonstrate the importance of breast screening programme, which has already helped save thousands of lives.

 

Share this page

Comments

There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!


Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based web development for the healthcare sector
© Mayden Foundation 2016