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Saturday 22nd October 2016

Breast cancer 'not linked' to meat

26th May 2009

There is no link between eating meat and the risk of getting breast cancer, according to a recent study.


Regardless of the degree to which the meat was cooked or processed, the study did not find any evidence that meat increased women's risk of breast cancer.

The results of the study contradict what previous studies seemed to show.

Other studies have shown that women's breast cancer risk increases along with their intake of red or processed meats.

There have been similar controversies about the role of saturated fats in causing breast cancer.

The finding comes as a result of data collected on women who had all passed menopause.

The information was collected between 1995 and 1996, when some 120,755 women reported their diets to the National Institutes of Health for the purposes of the study.

After eight years had elapsed, a total of  3,818 women had developed breast cancer.

A clear association could not be found linking the amount of meat women consumed to their breast cancer risk.

The researchers also could not see any difference between between red meat, white meat, processed meat, or meat cooked at high temperatures where breast cancer was concerned.

Geoffrey Kabat of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, who led the study, said that he and his colleagues did not support the hypothesis that a high intake of meat, red meat, processed meat, meat cooked at high temperatures, or meat mutagens is associated with increased risk of breast cancer.


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