FAQ
Log In
Monday 5th December 2016
News
 › 
 › 

Brits 'ops for partners'

29th August 2007

Research has shown that British women are "more likely" than American women to undergo cosmetic operations in order to make their partners happy.

botox1

The research, revealed to BBC Scotland by Aberdeen University's Dr Debra Gimlin, showed American women said they underwent surgery "for themselves".

Dr Gimlin spoke to 60 women - 40 British, living in Scotland and the south west of England, and 20 American, living on Long Island, New York. The women were aged between 23 to 52 years old.

Dr Gimlin said: "All my respondents were concerned with their physical attractiveness," however only the British respondents said they had plastic surgery to make their partner happy.

She said her findings revealed that British women who had undergone surgery were more likely to place "blame" on other people for their decision.

Dr Gimlin said that often the womens' partners offered to pay for an operation or commented on the way they looked. Sometimes a woman would have surgery in order to solidify an existing relationship.

She said the difference in healthcare systems between America and Britain contributed to the women's motives for having operations.

She said: "On the one hand, the privatised US system enshrines individual choice for those that can afford it, while the NHS ensures universal access.

"As such, healthcare in Britain is considered a social right rather than a consumer good or something to be 'earned'."

The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS) said women should always consider their options before having a cosmetic procedure.



Share this page

Comments

There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!


Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based applications for healthcare
© Mayden Foundation 2016