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Friday 23rd March 2018

Call for law change after teenager death

7th November 2006

28032006_ambulance.jpgA teenage girl died after suffering a severe epileptic fit, as paramedics stood by helplessly because they couldn’t supply a life-saving drug.

Fifteen-year-old Kayleigh Macilwraith-Christie, 15 suffered heart failure earlier this year after ambulance controllers repeatedly failed to get a trained paramedic to her who could administer the tranquiliser diazepam, a Class C controlled drug.

As her mother, Jean Murphy, delivers a 12,000-strong petition to the prime minister demanding a trained paramedic be put on every ambulance, the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust has called for a change in the law to add diazepam to the list of drugs that emergency response crews can administer.

The service admitted failings following an investigation into her death, after they sent a series of emergency medical technicians, who are trained in advanced first aid but are not permitted to provide the tranquilliser.

Kayleigh eventually received the drug at Whittington Hospital, 50 minutes after her seizure.

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Tuesday 14th November 2006 @ 14:59

We are organising a petition to get paramedics on all London ambulances following the death of Kayleigh.

If you need to speak to someone the best person is Michelle Greaves on 07984 567 834. We have an online petition and need to get as many signatures as we can.

Please have a look at our website www.kayleighmc.co.uk

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Article Information

Title: Call for law change after teenager death
Author: Carol burns
Article Id: 1039
Date Added: 7th Nov 2006


The Times

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