FAQ
Log In
Tuesday 6th December 2016
News
 › 
 › 

Cancer researchers change focus

28th November 2008

Researchers have said that cancer survival rates have "doubled" over the past 30 years but the increased rates "have not been evenly spread".

lab1

A five-year strategy aimed at boosting research into lung, pancreatic and oesophageal cancer - three of the deadliest cancers - was launched on 27 November.

The campaign will receive funding of £300 million. Harpal Kumar, chief executive of Cancer Research UK, said the charity wanted to ensure as many people survived as possible.

"Huge progress has been made in beating cancer over the past 30 years. But progress has been faster in some areas than in others. Our strategy is about doing those things we think will make the biggest difference over the next 15-20 years."

Breast cancer survival rates (for ten years) stand at 70% for women. Testicular, melanoma and Hodgkin's disease have 80% 10-year survival rates.

However, only 5% of people who have lung, pancreatic or oesophageal cancer stay alive for the same period.

Lung cancer follows breast cancer as the second most prevalent cancer in the UK. It causes the most deaths - 34,000 annually.

Mr Kumar said: "In these three cancers there has been a degree of defeatism. Researchers have said they are not sure they can improve survival so we won't try. We say there is progress we can make."

Cancer Research spent £13m on research into lung cancer, compared to £45 million which was given to fund research into breast cancer.

Share this page

Comments

There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!


Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

M3 - For secure managed hosting over N3 or internet
© Mayden Foundation 2016