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Saturday 22nd October 2016

Cannabis abuse rises 50%

11th January 2008

New figures have revealed that the number of adults seeking medical help for cannabis addiction has risen by 50% since the drug was downgraded.


In 2006/07, more than 16,500 adults sought treatment for cannabis use in England compared with 11,057 two years earlier when the drug moved from Class B to C.

However, the Department of Health has argued figures showing the rise in treatment – currently standing at 500 adults and children in England each week - reflected improvements in drug treatment and not cannabis use.

The figures have also shown that hospitals are treating more than 1,000 cases of alcohol-related problems a day.

It has emerged that the number of children needing medical help in hospitals or clinics after smoking cannabis has risen to more than 9,200 while there was a 40% rise in under-18s seen by doctors for alcohol-related problems over the last seven years.

Campaigners say that the findings revealed that young people are particularly at risk.

The British Medical Association said the figures strengthened its opposition to cannabis while the charity Addaction, which treats people with drug problems, warned that young people often use cannabis at crucial development stages in their lives.

A spokesman for the charity warned it has a serious impact on mental health and physical development.

A Department of Health spokesperson said: “The increasing numbers accessing treatment as a result of cannabis use demonstrates that treatment services are getting better at engaging those in need of treatment, despite an overall reduction in the prevalence of cannabis use.?


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