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Saturday 22nd October 2016

Child diabetes hospital rise

23rd June 2008

Statistics have shown that the amount of children who required emergency treatment due to "complications of diabetes" has increased.


The increase in cases since 2002 was mentioned in a Parliamentary answer.

In 2007, 3,317 hospital admissions were recorded for children who had "potentially coma-inducing complication diabetic ketoacidosis" in comparison with 2,617 five years previously.

Diabetic ketoacidosis is often the first indication that a child has diabetes, with signs including tiredness, vomiting and weight loss. Ketoacidosis can prove fatal if left untreated.

Children who have type I diabetes are given insulin injections to control blood sugar levels. If these are not administered regularly or correctly, then ketoacidosis can occur.

Professor Peter Hindmarsh, from the Institute of Child Health, is the chair of a group which has been given the task of looking at the treatment of diabetic children.

He said more people were being diagnosed with diabetes and tended to remain in hospital when they were diagnosed.

"However, the shortage of specialist care might have something to do with; we haven't got enough people on the ground to deliver the service," he added.

A spokesman for the Department of Health said: "The government has recognised that the quality of diabetes care for children and young people can be variable and we set up a working group to establish what needed to be done to improve this."

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