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Sunday 23rd October 2016

Diabetes linked to depression

24th April 2007

A 10-year study in the United States has found a link between depression and diabetes in older adults.

Old Hands

The study, led by Mercedes Carnethon of the Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine tracked diabetes and the symptoms of depression in nearly 5,000 people in four US states.

It found that, even allowing for the fact that depressed people might take less care of themselves than non-depressed people, there was still a clear link between the two, suggesting that depression might play a role in the development of diabetes.

The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, said people with a high number of symptoms of depression were about 60% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, than people not considered depressed.

Unlike previous studies, it looked at the effects not only of single bouts of depression but also of chronic depression and depression that worsened over time. It found an increased risk for diabetes in each of those scenarios.

Researchers tracked 4,681 men and women in North Carolina, California, Maryland and Pennsylvania ages 65 and older, with an average age of 73, who did not have diabetes when the study began in 1989.

They were screened annually over a decade for 10 symptoms of depression, including factors indicating mood, irritability, calorie intake, concentration and sleep.

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Karen McDonald

Wednesday 25th April 2007 @ 20:32

Finally - someone's noticed the symptoms of depression which could indicate a faulty metabolism - ie diabetes, a disorder among many. We're getting there!

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