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Monday 24th October 2016

Early menopause no link to IVF

2nd May 2008

One of the first studies into the long-term effects of IVF treatment has concluded that it does not lead to an early menopause in women.

This position has been suspected for some time by doctors but this study, from the Bourn Hall Clinic in Cambridgeshire, now provides the clinical evidence to support this.

The study focused on about 200 women who were among the first to undergo IVF treatment in the 1980s when it involved a much heavier drug regime.

Most, however, started the menopause around the age of 50 and in line with the national average.

The basis of the suggestion that IVF could bring on the menopause early was because of concerns that stimulating the ovaries to generate the eggs required for treatment might speed up their decline.

But the Bourn Hall findings, published on Reproductive Bio Medicine Online, countered this.

Dr Kay Elder from Bourn Hall, who led the research, said that although all the studies show that IVF treatment was safe, they were not able to predict long term impacts.

The study team also included researchers from Queensland University, Australia, and Cornell University in the United States.

Laurence Shaw from the British Fertility Society said the findings of the research were not surprising but that it was “nonetheless a very helpful study indeed.�

He added: “This is a question patients often ask - and it’s very useful to finally have a scientific study to point to which offers them reassurance that IVF will not affect the timing or severity of the menopause.�


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