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Elderly being 'starved to death'

8th May 2007

Thousands of elderly people are living in care homes which provide ‘poor’ living conditions, says a report.

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The survey, by the Commission for Social Care Inspection, was accessed by the Liberal Democrats under the Freedom of Information Act to highlight the desperate state of some of the UK’s care homes. Inspectors found that some care homes are so dirty they put residents at risk of infection while others are neglecting patients so much that they are succumbing to malnutrition.  Untrained staff and generally low standards are leaving elderly people in care homes vulnerable and exposed.

The Commission for Social Care Inspection, which monitors care facilities across the UK, categorises homes as poor, adequate, good or excellent. In total it graded 732 homes as poor and 3,086 as adequate.  A spokesperson for the Liberal Democrats said, “This is the first time that we have had a list of care homes which are delivering a poor service - and it's a disappointing picture. Vulnerable residents across the country are enduring appalling conditions, where unclean rooms are putting them at risk of infection and they have no access to medical help when they need it.?

More than 400,000 of those aged 65 and above live in care homes and the government is under increasing pressure to provide more money to look after them.  Health Minister Ivan Lewis admitted that many elderly people were effectively being starved to death in some care homes and said the government was fully aware of the crisis facing Britain’s elderly population.

 

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