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Sunday 23rd October 2016

Exercise after meals

5th June 2007

UK scientists have said that taking exercise after meals can help weight loss by increasing hormones that reduce appetite.


Researchers at Surrey University and Imperial College London published the results of their research in the Journal of Endocrinology. It showed that because of the hormones, people taking exercise after eating felt less hungry, with the benefits lasting to their next meal.

Researcher Dr Denise Robertson said: "Our research shows that exercise may alter people's appetite to help them lose weight and prevent further weight gain as part of a healthy, balanced lifestyle."

In the course of the experiment, twelve subjects ate the same breakfast. After an hour, half exercised for an hour while the other half sat down. The subjects were then given another hour before they were free to eat what they chose.

When researchers factored in the energy burned during exercise, the active group consumed fewer calories - 421 kcal compared to 565 kcal in the sedentary group.

Hormones PYY, GLP-1 and PP, which communicate with the brain to inform it that the stomach is full, showed increased levels during and after exercise. The subjects stated that they did not feel as hungry in this time.

Dr Ian Campbell, medical director of the charity Weight Concern, said: "Increased physical activity is an essential part of any weight management programme, not just to expend more calories but also, as we see here, to help control our appetite too."

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