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Figures on teen binge drinking

28th March 2008

A study in the North West of England has claimed that teenagers are drinking an average of 44 bottles of wine or 177 pints of beer a year each.

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The research carried out by Liverpool John Moores University questioned just under 10,000 15-to-16-year-olds for the study into underage drinking and violence.

It found as many as 40% of teenagers in poor areas binge drink and follows on from recent high-profile murders in the region that were committed by teenagers who had been drinking heavily.

The latest report was carried out by the university’s Centre for Public Health with the Home Office and Trading Standards North West.

It suggested that 190,000 15-to-16-year-olds in England drink with more than a quarter of them having more than five drinks in one session.

Half drank at least once a week with 40% of girls and 42% of boys later involved in violence.

There was also a link with deprivation with poor children more likely to be violent after drinking than children in affluent areas.

Report co-author Professor Mark Bellis said: “These figures highlight the sheer quantity of alcohol being consumed by under-age drinkers across the North West.

“Without a clear message that under-age drunkenness will not be tolerated, we will continue to see the high levels of alcohol bingeing and related violence identified in this study.?

The deputy regional director of public health in North West, Dominic Harrison, said the research confirmed the experiences of people who saw the rising problem of young people and drink across the region.

 

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