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Thursday 27th October 2016

Firm handshake secret to long life

10th September 2010

New research has suggested that a firm handshake could be the signal that a person will enjoy a long life.


Research published in the British Medical Journal says that men and women with a strong grip tend to outlive those with a lighter handshake.

The studies from the MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at University College London also indicates that people with good balance, those who can walk at a brisk pace and are able to get up out of a chair easily, are also likely to live longer.

The researchers concluded that these measures of physical capability could be used to predict the risk of all causes of death among older people who still lived in their own homes.

“Such measures may therefore provide useful tools for identifying older people at higher risk of death,” they said in a report.

Lead author Dr Rachel Cooper added: “Ultimately, trials will be needed to determine whether interventions aimed at improving physical capability are effective at improving capability and as a consequence are effective at reducing morbidity and mortality.

“Research that helps people to enjoy a long and healthy life is ever more important to help cater for an ageing population.”

For the research, the team combined the findings of 33 studies from around the world, involving more than 50,000 men and women. Some had been tracked for more than four decades. Taken together, the studies found strength of grip to be clearly linked with longevity, even in the young.


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