Log In
Friday 28th October 2016

Girls of 12 will get cancer jab

21st June 2007

Routine jabs to protect against cervical cancer could be given to girls as young as 12 from next year.


The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has recommended the use of vaccines to protect against the sexually-transmitted infection human papillomavirus (HPV), which can lead to cervical cancer.

It is hoped that the injection could cut the number of deaths from the disease by three-quarters and reduce the need for smear tests, though some campaigners – including the National Family Campaign - say the initiative sends out the wrong signal to children.

They fear that providing an injection against a sexually transmitted infection in teenage girls could encourage them to become sexually active.

It is likely that every girl would be protected against HPV in their first year of secondary school.

Around 3,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in Britain, while 1,000 are killed by the disease. Scientists believe that cancer cases will fall by around 61% even if only 80% of girls are vaccinated.

Two vaccines have been developed to protect against HPV - Gardasil and Cervarix.
The jabs, which will not be compulsory, will cost about £300 and will be given in three doses over a six-month period.

Dr Syed Ahmed, a committee member, said the vast majority of parents were in favour of the vaccine.

He said: “I don't think girls are thinking about cancer when they decide whether or not to have sex. They are more concerned about becoming pregnant or catching chlamydia or gonorrhoea.?


Share this page


There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!

Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based applications for healthcare
© Mayden Foundation 2016