FAQ
Log In
Monday 5th December 2016
News
 › 
 › 

Government campaign targets obesity

2nd January 2009

A new healthy living campaign has been launched by the government in a fresh bid to tackle the rising obesity rates in England.

obesity1

The "Change4Life" strategy will include TV adverts compiled by Aardman Animations, the organisation behind Wallace and Gromit, that are designed to appeal to families and warning of the risks of too much body fat.

Companies taking part in the initiative include Tesco, Kellogg’s and Unilever, which will be promoting an "eat well, move more, live longer" message.

The campaign follows warnings that obese and overweight people could be costing the taxpayer £50bn a year by 2050 with 90% of children overweight and a Foresight report that indicated obesity had become a norm in society.

Public health minister Dawn Primarolo said: "The message at the heart of the Change4Life campaign is that there are very serious health consequences associated with allowing dangerous amounts of fat to build up in our bodies."

Chief Medical Officer Sir Liam Donaldson said only 6% of people understood the health risks of being overweight.

He added: "Many people see fat as a vanity issue rather than a health issue and they need to see it as a health issue."

Unilever, the company behind Flora, will use the logo in its sponsorship of the London Marathon. The Co-op, National Convenience Stores and Tesco will have the branding in its shops and PepsiCo UK will run an advertising campaign to promote "active play" through sports personalities.

The campaign will run alongside the similar Take Life On programme in Scotland.

 

Share this page

Comments

There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!


Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based applications for healthcare
© Mayden Foundation 2016