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GP consortia to have nurse on board

8th June 2011

Nursing Times has reported that the government intends to make it a compulsory requirement that GP consortia have a nurse as part of the management board.

doctorsandnurses

As part of a speech at a London hospital today, Prime Minister David Cameron said: "Hospital doctors and nurses will be involved in clinical commissioning."

Nursing Times said it understood that the government will tell consortia that they must have a board, and that a nurse must be part of the board.

It also reported that hospital doctors and nurses were the only type of medics who the government will insist on being part of the boards.

Head of the Royal College of Nursing Peter Carter said if the government's plans were carried out it would be a vindication of all the work carried out by the RCN on the issue following the publication of the health white paper in summer 2010.

Dr Carter said: "From the time you come into the healthcare system you will never be far from a nurse. Nurses understand the intricacies of the care pathway and the need to provide a comprehensive range of services."

He said the presence of a nurse on the boards would not just be a token one and added that arguments based on that idea had no weight.

"We are not talking about some newly qualified band five being put on the board; we are talking about people with experience and gravitas. Most of the progressive GPs and secondary consultants recognise that if you want something to work just as you have to have doctors, you have to have nurses involved," he explained.

 

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siew allen

Wednesday 8th June 2011 @ 17:51

I agree with David Cameron and Dr Carter that experienced nurses who frontline the real NHS service have a great deal to offer the doctors on how to run a consortia. Nurses and also other health specialists may have their own remits but the synergy of all important services efforts should be utilised for the best results. Pragmatism should be the key here in order to deliver real patient care, whether it is in primary, intermediate or secondary care.


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