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GP warns of exercise dangers

5th December 2006

In what he describes as “medical heresy�, Dr Simon Atkins has told Guardian readers not to rush into exercise in the New Year.

In a recent article, the GP has warned of the dangers of over-ambitious fitness regimes which fill his surgery with patients suffering exercise related injuries for weeks in January. Dr Atkins writes that “after festive overindulgence [ruthless exercising] is the worst thing you can do�.

The doctor does go on to extol the virtues of regular exercise along with telling people to eat healthily and quit their vices, but he warns that too much too soon in the exercise department can have adverse effects. He states the recent incidence of four seemingly healthy young runners who died suddenly from previously undiagnosed cardiac problems during this year’s Great North Run.

Despite potential problems, the benefits of exercise - weight loss, lower blood pressure, stronger bones, and improved mental health - far outweigh the risks. Dr Atkins encourages his readers to build up their exercise regimes slowly, ensure they wear the right equipment, warm up properly and drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration.

 

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Article Information

Title: GP warns of exercise dangers
Author: Martine Hamilton
Article Id: 1416
Date Added: 5th Dec 2006

Sources

The Guardian

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