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Saturday 22nd October 2016

GPs concern over new database

22nd November 2006

04032006_LaptopStethoscope1.jpgAs many as four in five doctors fear the new NHS national database system could open up confidential medical records to hackers, and put patients at risk of bribery and even blackmail.

And around half of GPs have threatened to ignore new government rules on using the new Spine database because of concerns about patient confidentiality, according to a survey by the Guardian newspaper.

It comes despite more than half of GPs and hospital doctors believing the new system will improve care, by providing easy access to up-to-date information on their patients.

GPs are not alone in their concerns over confidentiality. The National Association for Mental Health (Mind) has argued that records including details of mental illnesses were particularly sensitive.

The British Medical Association is supporting explicit consent for the new system to ensure patients know what is going on with their records. Currently the system is to be introduced using 'implied consent' following general public information programmes.

The database forms part of the NHS £12bn IT upgrade being run by the Connecting for Health agency.

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Pat Roberts

Friday 24th November 2006 @ 14:39

It seems suprising that we are paying £6 billion to IT experts, when it appears that 50 % of GP's & Hospital Dr's have sufficient knowledge in IT to criticise the technology & know how easy the system would be for hackers to use.
Should we stop the progress of this project of 'joined up thinking' in the NHS with amazing potential for the health of the nation or consider how other systems& companies cope with sensitive/confidential material and let the experts do their best?

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