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Thursday 8th December 2016
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Junior doctor website ditched

16th May 2007

The computerised system to recruit junior doctors to the NHS has been ditched after a series of problems.

The website had been used for junior doctors to apply for and track their application progress but from now on it will only be used in a monitoring role.

Government ministers have, however, pledged to see through the first round of the recruitment process but in future junior doctors will have to apply directly to hospitals for jobs.

The new process was introduced under the Department of Health’s Modernising Medical Careers system but has faced months of criticism. It has also faced technical problems, data has been lost and there have been difficulties for doctors filing applications online.

In the worst security breach on the system, candidates’ personal details were openly displayed on the site. Ms Hewitt apologised but the leak is now being investigated by the Information Commissioner’s office.

Consultant had also threatened to boycott the system which was seen as putting the future careers of up to 30,000 junior doctors at stake.

Ms Hewitt said: “Given the continuing concerns of junior doctors about MTAS, the system will not be used for matching candidates to training posts, but will continue to be used for national monitoring.?

The British Medical Association has welcomed the announcement of the abandonment of the MTAS system, which Dr Andrew Rowland, vice chairman of the BMA Junior Doctors Committee, described as “unfair, discredited, and shambolic.?

Health Secretary Patricia Hewitt made the announcement about the Medical Training Application System (MTAS).

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