Log In
Wednesday 26th October 2016

Lose weight and give your kidneys a break

18th September 2009

Overweight or obese adults with kidney disease could ward off further problems if they lose some excess pounds, a new study has shown.


When kidneys are damaged, their ability to filter waste products from the blood and excrete them in the urine is reduced.

Weight loss not only helps kidney disease, but also controls diabetes, and improves blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

More than one third of adults in the United States would benefit from losing weight.

A team led by Sankar Navaneethan of the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio pooled data from 13 studies to see if losing weight protected the kidneys.

The data showed the impact of weight loss through either diet, exercise or surgery.

Writing in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Navaneethan's team found that one key sign of kidney disease, excess protein in the urine, was reduced by weight loss through any of these methods.

Those who achieved their weight loss with diet and exercise might see even more of a benefit in terms of preventing further decline in kidney function.

However, people who had undergone weight loss surgery were more likely to see their abnormally high kidney filtration rates reduced.

Chronic kidney disease affects more than 20 million Americans. By 2015 more than 700,000 people are expected to develop the most advanced form of kidney disease known as end-stage renal disease or ESRD.

Navaneethan's team said the costs associated with these figures was "staggering."

They concluded that real benefits to the kidneys may be had from weight loss in obese adults.

Share this page


There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!

Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based applications for healthcare
© Mayden Foundation 2016