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Wednesday 26th October 2016

Missed pill causes abortions

12th February 2007

A new survey has revealed that the majority of abortions are carried out on women in their twenties.


The research, carried out by long-term contraceptive manufacturers Schering Health Care, found that 12% of women aged between 26 and 34 in a committed relationship have had an abortion and 27% of these women conceived a child because they had forgotten to take their contraceptive pill every day. Responding to the research, women's health specialist Dr Dawn Harper has said she believes the combined contraceptive pill is not necessarily the most suitable form of birth control for all women. Dr Harper has suggested women need to be made aware of alternatives to the Pill which may provide them with more effective contraception. She added that, “[Intrauterine contraceptives] can usually be fitted in five minutes by a healthcare professional. Once fitted, they can be forgotten about for anything up to ten years, leaving women free to enjoy their lives in the knowledge they are protected from pregnancy�.

The Schering survey of 1,020 women found that 93% said it was ‘important’ or ‘vital’ that they were able to control the number of children they had prompting the pharmaceutical company to promote the benefits of long-term contraceptives such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants. Family planning experts have responded to the survey by saying that women are not being helped by the closure of contraceptive clinics and the reluctance of primary care trusts to pay for long-lasting contraception, which in the short term is more expensive than the daily contraceptive pill. Ann Furedi, of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, said it was disappointing that little effort seemed to be going into producing new methods of contraception for women who were unhappy with hormonal methods like the pill. "Women who find current contraceptive methods difficult seem to have fallen off the agenda," she said.

An additional survey by the Family Planning Association (FPA) has revealed extensive ignorance from the general public about sex and reproduction. The charity found that nearly 30% of those surveyed thought that jumping up and down after sex, douching or urinating would stop a woman becoming pregnant and nearly 90% did not know that sperm could live inside a woman’s body for up to seven days. The FPA is calling on the government to make sex education a statutory part of the national curriculum.

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