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Tuesday 25th October 2016

New endometriosis test

20th August 2009

Scientists have developed a quick and simple way to diagnose endometriosis.

The new technique, which involves taking a small sample of womb lining in a similar way to a smear test to check for the presence of nerve fibres, avoids the need for surgery.

Reports in the Human Reproduction journal say that the technique is able to predict the condition with close on to 100% accuracy.

Endometriosis affects two million woman in Britain, normally between the ages of 25 and 40 and can cause pain, discomfort and even infertility.

Laparoscopy is usually used to diagnose the condition and is carried out under general anaesthetic but it is a procedure that can cause complications.

The endometrial biopsy, however, can be conducted in a clinical setting while the patient is fully conscious.

In a trial, the test confirmed 63 out of 64 cases of endometriosis and 29 out of 34 without the condition.

Lead researcher Dr Moamar Al-Jefout of Mu'tah University in Jordan said: "This test is probably as accurate as assessment via laparoscopy, the current gold standard, especially as it is unclear how often endometriosis is overlooked, even by experienced gynaecologists.”

Professor David Healy, president-elect of the International Federation of Fertility Societies, described the new test to diagnose endometriosis was very exciting.

The Endometriosis SHE Trust said that the findings were promising but larger trials were needed.

The charity’s spokesman Chris Mann felt the test would not replace the role of laparoscopy but could be a useful addition in establishing the condition.


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