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Wednesday 26th October 2016

New hope for diabetics

9th November 2006

07072006_diabetes_1.jpgDiabetic children could soon be free of injections thanks to a virtual pancreas which can monitor blood sugar levels and administer insulin injections when needed.

Onset of type 1 diabetes, which affects around 350,000 people in the UK, typically occurs in children or young adults and requires self-monitoring through 'finger prick' tests and insulin injections, usually several times a day.

Now a new device is to be trialled by scientists at Cambridge University from January, which uses a computer to monitor blood sugar levels and maintains it by giving insulin when needed.

The speed with which insulin is delivered could help reduce long-term complications associated with diabetes such as blindness and circulatory problems which can lead to amputation.

The device works by monitoring blood glucose, connected wirelessly to a computer and an insulin pump worn on the patient’s belt.

The project is supported by a £500,000 grant from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

Type 1 diabetes is caused when cells in the pancreas are killed by the immune system, leaving it unable to balance blood sugar levels.

The trial will begin with 12 children aged between 5 and 18 who will use the programme at night while being monitored in hospital.

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Ryad Salman

Friday 10th November 2006 @ 7:46

Dear Sir ..It is actually the greatest help I have ever dreamt of. I am a doctor and have got a grand-daughter three years old with type I diabetes and got very much worried about the very gloomy outcome of her disease. I can say with though limited assurance that there is some hope in the near future for a relief as good as I have read . God bless you all...........

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