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Number of people dying from effects of alcohol rising

29th January 2010

New figures have shown a sharp rise in the number of people in the UK dying from the effects of alcohol.

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Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) revealed that annual deaths have more than doubled since 1992, from 4,023 to 9,031 in 2008.

Men are twice as likely to die from alcohol than women with the rate of male deaths more than doubling since 1991, from 9.1 per 100,000 to 18.7 per 100,000 in 2008.

The charity Drinkaware said it was shocking to discover that alcohol-related deaths were again on the increase.

Chief executive Chris Sorek said: "It's vital now, more than ever, that we act to reduce the harms caused by drinking too much.

"With more and more people dying from alcohol misuse it's essential we change people's relationship with drinking, and education has a key role to play.”

The ONS findings show 20% of men and 14% of women aged 65 and over drink every day compared with 1% of 16-24-year-olds and 39% of men and 31% of women exceed the recommended daily drinking limit of three to four units a day for men and two to three units for women.

Many people did their heaviest drinking at home.

The government has launched a new advertising campaign - backed by Cancer Research UK, the British Heart Foundation and the Stroke – warning of the dangers.

Public health minister Gillian Merron said: “If you're regularly drinking more than the NHS recommended limits, you're more likely to get cancer, have a stroke or have a heart attack.”

 

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