FAQ
Log In
Friday 9th December 2016
News
 › 
 › 

Public drunks could get fined

14th March 2008

A doctor has called for the government to impose a £100 fine on members of the public who are drunk.

Beer1

Plastic surgeon Peter Mahaffey spoke to the British Medical Journal. He said the police force needed to breathalyse people they thought were drunk, and impose fines if the person was "three times over the drink-drive limit."

Mr Maheffey, who works at Bedford Hospital, came up with the idea following his treatment of people for facial scars and nerve damage, and who had been injured in connection with alcohol.

He said that fines would quickly teach people that drinking too much alcohol was unacceptable: "We need to send out a strong message."

"I see people with terrible injuries that they will never recover from. Now is the time to act."

The government has said that by 2011, every medical school in England will give students lessons on how to deal with alcohol abuse. The schools have also been given £650,000 in order to find the optimal method of training their students about alcohol.

Public health minister Dawn Primarolo spoke at the British Medical Association's public health conference and stated: "Doctors and nurses are our eyes and ears when it comes to identifying problem drinkers."

The government estimated there are about 10 million people in the country who are seriously harming themselves due to their alcohol consumption.

The number of people drinking has shown a steady increase since 1993, with statistics showing about one third of the male population and one fifth of the female population drinks too much every week.









Share this page

Comments

There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!


Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based web development for the healthcare sector
© Mayden Foundation 2016