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Rise in Brits hospitalised abroad

19th July 2012

New figures from the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office have shown a significant rise in the number of UK holidaymakers needing hospital treatment in overseas holiday destinations.

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Serious hospitalisations in Spain, Greece and Egypt are up almost 10% and worldwide 3,739 people from the UK ended up in hospitals in the 12 months to April.

That amounts to 70 British people a week requiring treatment in a foreign hospital with more than 30% of these in Spain with the majority on the Islands of Ibiza and Majorca.

Paul Abrey, the head of the British Consulate for the Balearic Islands, said: “Far too many people put themselves in vulnerable situations. That may be drinking too much, drugs or making themselves incapable and not taking appropriate precautions.”

Last year 541 British people had life-threatening injuries on the Balearics and in Ibiza, the island’s main hospital finds that it is at its busiest at 5am when the clubs close.

Many are teenagers who have come on holiday unprepared but other factors are road accidents, balcony falls and people taking drugs or drinking too much.

Abta believes people need better advice and say that booking with companies with good reputations mean holidaymakers will receive better information on vaccinations and travel insurance.

UK embassy officials say people should take out travel insurance but also get a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) which is free and allows basic hospital treatment if you they hurt in most of Europe.

Other areas where British people are likely to be hospitalised are Greece and Thailand.

 

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