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Wednesday 26th October 2016

Smokers quit after ban

29th January 2008

There was a 28% rise in the number of people who stopped smoking using the services of the NHS during April-September 2007, in comparison with 2006.


Stop Smoking Services, supplied by the NHS, were used by almost 165,000 people during April to September 2007.

The figures, released by the Information Centre for Health and Social Care, are the first ones to incorporate the period when the smoking ban was introduced.

The statistics show that in 2005, 142,188 people gave up, in 2006, 128,868 quit and in 2007, 164,711 stopped smoking.

The figures do not incorporate those smokers who stopped smoking using non-NHS methods.

Other figures have revealed that the sale of cigarettes in the UK fell by 11% in July 2007 compared with July's figures for the previous year. The most recent data showed that the numbers of smokers in the adult population decreased to 22% in 2006.

"It's great news that so many smokers have been able to quit, preventing serious health problems and complications. It's not easy to overcome a nicotine addiction so it's clear that the NHS Stop Smoking Service is providing a vital service," said Public Health Minister Dawn Primarolo.

"And these figures are confirmation that the £56m we invested into the service last year was money well spent."

Health authorities which reported the highest levels of success were: the East Midlands, East of England, South Central and South East Coast Strategic Health Authorities, The North East SHA had the lowest levels.

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