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Superbug vaccines in a decade

14th July 2008

The government's chief medical officer for England, Sir Liam Donaldson, has said "vaccines against the two major hospital superbugs" should be produced within ten years.

MRSA1

Sir Liam's report will indicate that patients should be offered immunisations against MRSA and Clostridium difficile.

The two superbugs caused 8,000 deaths in England and Wales in 2005 and 2006.

Sir Liam spoke to the Observer and said that vaccines for C difficile should be offered within five years, and for MRSA within five to 10 years.

Sir Liam said the vaccines could be used to offer protection to a patient who was entering hospital to be operated on.

"The other way of looking at it would be to try to interrupt the chain of transmission - to study the pattern of infection in the community, in hospitals and nursing homes, and try to eradicate the pools of infection."

Sir Liam added that hospital staff would need to remain vigilant in case a new strain of infection emerged.

In 2008, the government has introduced a £50 million deep clean of hospitals.

The rates of MRSA infections have decreased steadily since 2006 and the government believes it will reach its target to cut rates by 50%. However the rates have recently stalled at "just under 4,000 cases per quarter in England".

Scotland has higher rates of hospital superbugs, while Wales and Northern Ireland have lower rates.

 

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spencer jones

Thursday 24th July 2008 @ 13:29

Fortunately, four recent medical studies have demonstrated that an inexpensive and completely natural substance called colloidal silver decimates MRSA. You can read a very interesting report on it at www.ColloidalSilverCuresMRSA.com


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