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Friday 21st October 2016

Technology linked to well-being

13th May 2010

A study has suggested there are positive links between access to technology and feelings of well-being.


A survey of more than 35,000 people worldwide by BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, found that women in developing countries, and people of both sexes with low incomes or poor education, were most influenced emotionally by their access to technology.

Researcher Paul Flatters of Trajectory Partnership, which conducted the research on behalf of the BCS, said this was in part because women tended to have a more central role in family and other social networks.

"Our hypothesis is that women in developing countries benefit more because they are more socially constrained in society," he added. "The next phase of our research is to test that."

The BCS study also found that the correlation did not appear to increase with age.

However, the findings do go against the views of some psychologists.

In an opinion column for New Scientist last year Yair Amichai-Hamburger, director of the Research Center for Internet Psychology at the Sammy Ofer School of Communications in Israel, wrote that technology had a negative impact on people's well-being by blurring professional and personal time.

He said people need to regain mastery over technology and learn to use it "in a healthy and positive way".

While acknowledging the BCS results are slightly counter-intuitive Mr Flatters said: "A lot of things that are written about IT are negative. But we were puzzled by the fact that people are attached to their IT as well."


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