Log In
Friday 28th October 2016

Treating smokers costs NHS billions

7th October 2008

An anti-smoking group has said that the treatment of people who smoke costs the health service £2.7 billion annually, when it cost £1.7 billion ten years ago.


Ash said in their report that the amount spent would have increased to more than £3 billion, if the numbers of smokers had not decreased - due to the smoking ban - from 12 million to nine million.

More than 80,000 deaths are caused by smoking-related diseases in England annually.

The report laid out proposals to decrease the number of people who smoke. The government is currently carrying out a consultation process to decide which measures to put in place regarding tobacco legislation.

Proposals include unbranded packaging for tobacco products and limiting how products are displayed in retail outlets.

From 2003, companies producing tobacco products have not been able to imply that their products are "less harmful than another".

One in seven 15 year olds smoke on a regular basis. 66% of people who smoke regularly pick up the habit before they are 18 years old, while 39% begin before they are 16.

Researchers at Nottingham University found that certain words and packaging encouraged young smokers to think that those products would not cause as much damage to their health.

Deborah Arnott, director of Ash, said: "The government could save thousands of lives and hundreds of millions from the NHS budget with an ambitious new tobacco control strategy."

"More than anything we need to protect young people from the aggressive marketing techniques employed by the tobacco industry."


Share this page


There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!

Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based web development for the healthcare sector
© Mayden Foundation 2016