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Tuesday 6th December 2016
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Warning on child head injuries

29th October 2007

The Children's Trust has said that people responsible for looking after children should watch out for head injuries in children.

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Around 5,000 children annually are thought to suffer brain injuries which could lead to problems with memory and movement. Children can suffer head injuries by banging their heads, choking or drowning.

Early in 2007, the National Institute of Clinical and Health Excellence (NICE) published guidance which warned that far higher numbers of children could be living with the consequences of a sustained brain injury.

Children with brain injuries can appear normal until they are faced with a high-pressured situation such as changing or starting a new school.

Luke Griggs, spokesperson for Headway UK, the brain injury association, said: "Brain injury is often known as the hidden disability as often there are no obvious physical signs."

"Early intervention and treatment for a head injury is very important for a good long-term prognosis, and it is always wise to seek medical attention if in any doubt as to the seriousness of a head injury."

Fiona Adcock, a spokesperson for the charity said that a new school was a challenge for any child, but for a child with a brain injury it can cause a "major negative impact".

She said parents and teachers need to look out for children they believe might have had a brain injury in the past. Symptoms include problems with memory, tiredness and co-ordination.

 

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