Log In
Thursday 27th October 2016

Weightlifting helps pensioners live longer

14th September 2009

Research by the University of Nottingham has found that if an elderly person lifts weights it can send blood to their muscles and decrease muscle wastage.


Muscles get smaller as a person ages, causing a reduction in strength and heightening the risk of bones breaking if falls occur. When an injury happens, the danger of death in the two years following the accident is doubled.

Elderly people cannot build muscles as quickly as younger people, due to the fact that they are unable to process the conversion of food protein into the maintenance of muscle density as accurately.

The researchers said older people needed to lift weights for an hour, twice weekly, in order to keep their muscles functioning properly.

The researchers compared a group of participants in their 60s and 70s with people aged 25 years old.

Professor of Clinical Physiology Michael Rennie said: "I recommend they should go to the gym and do weight training. They will stay lean and strong."

"You don't have to do a lot of weight training. People in our research were in their 60s and 70s and they managed to do it twice a week."

He added that lifting weights would not provide a cure for muscle wastage but could decrease the rate at which it occurred.

Share this page


There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!

Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

M3 - For secure managed hosting over N3 or internet
© Mayden Foundation 2016