Log In
Thursday 27th October 2016

West Scotland worst for cancer

7th October 2008

New research has shown that people who live in West Scotland have 50% more likelihood of lung cancer than the rest of the UK.


Death rates for that area, according to information about mortality and cases of cancer in 2005, were also twice that of the rest of the UK.

The information was published by the National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN) and shown at the National Cancer Research Institute conference in Birmingham.

In 2005, 77 out of every 100,000 people who lived in the west of Scotland had received a diagnosis of lung cancer, in comparison to 55 per 100,000 in the north of Scotland and 64 in the south east of England.

The figure for the UK as a whole was 49 in every 100,000.

The information also showed that patients in the west had 30% more likelihood of dying from lung cancer than people in other areas of Scotland.

Women in the west of Scotland had 50% more chance of lung cancer than men in Surrey, West Sussex and Hampshire.

Professor David Forman, from Leeds University, said: "Smoking rates are around 5% higher in Scotland than the rest of the UK, and this significantly contributes to the higher rates of lung cancer - smoking is responsible for nearly nine in ten cases of lung cancer."

"We know that smoking rates are linked to deprivation - rates are around 10% higher in working class communities."

Professor Sir Alex Markham, chairman of the NCIN, said that high levels of smoking in Scotland caused the difference in cancer rates.


Share this page


There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!

Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based web development for the healthcare sector
© Mayden Foundation 2016