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Friday 28th October 2016

Widespread depression in teens

24th April 2008

A report by a leading national children’s charity has warned that depression could be a problem for a large number of teenagers.


More than a quarter of the 8,000 teenagers aged 14 to 16 who were questioned for the Children’s Society said that they frequently felt depressed.

Children also said they felt under pressure from school, classmates and family expectations, 70% said they felt they needed to “look good? or were on a diet and 27% agreed with the statement “I often feel depressed.?

The findings follow a 2007 UNICEF poll which rated the UK bottom of a league of industrialised countries for child well-being, saying British children were under-educated, unhappy and unhealthy compared with other European countries.

Children’s Society chief executive Bob Reitemeier said that the mental symptoms of children needed to be addressed to help give children a better childhood.

He added: “There is a growing recognition of the true cost of neglecting children's mental health and wellbeing.?

Marjorie Wallace, the chief executive of the charity Sane, said that it was vital that all children and young people with mental health problems were identified and treated from the earliest stage.

Professor Stephen Scott, from the Institute of Psychiatry, who was one of the contributors to the inquiry, said that child mental health should be “everyone’s business? with support for parents needed as well.

While acknowledging there were problems, Children’s Minister Kevin Brennan said that other national surveys had suggested that children generally felt well and good about themselves.


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