Log In
Saturday 22nd October 2016

Women live longer than men

10th April 2006

10042006_grandmother1.jpgResearchers in the BMJ say that 2006 is likely to be the first year in human history when, across almost all the world, women can expect to outlive men. In all western European countries the life expectancy gap between women and men is now narrowing.

Danny Dorling, Professor of Human Geography at the University of Sheffield, and colleagues say that in many countries of the world women could expect, until recently, to live fewer years than men and that maternal death in particular remains a big killer. In Europe, men last outlived women in the Netherlands in 1860 and in Italy in 1889. Elsewhere females’ life expectancy has long exceeded males’: in Sweden since 1751, Denmark since 1835, England and Wales since 1841.

The authors say that greater emancipation has freed women to demand better health care and to behave more like men, and most importantly to smoke.

They add that life expectancy data apply from birth onwards, so the picture would be different in some countries if life expectancy from conception was considered. However they conclude that even the life expectancy from birth may not be a permanent achievement, given that the largest remaining untapped market for cigarettes in the world is made up of women living in poorer countries.

Share this page


There are no comments for this article, be the first to comment!

Post your comment

Only registered users can comment. Fill in your e-mail address for quick registration.

Your email address:

Your comment will be checked by a Healthcare Today moderator before it is published on the site.

Mayden - Innovative cloud-based applications for healthcare
© Mayden Foundation 2016