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Worst performing trusts defend care

30th November 2011

Two hospitals identified as the worst performing trusts in the Dr Foster Hospital Guide 2011 have defended their record.

This is despite data showing they have higher than expected mortality rates across a range of indicators.

To measure mortality the guide looked at the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR), the new summary hospital-level mortality indicator, deaths after surgery, and deaths from conditions that patients would normally survive.

Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, which was one of just two trusts to have higher than expected mortality rates across three of the four indicators, said it was confident it was providing patients with a safe service.

A spokesperson said: “In the past year we have conducted a complete review of our mortality rating and sought the advice of national experts to help us understand our figures and we are confident that we provide a safe level of care for our patients.”

Also defending its performance was University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust which had the second highest rate of deaths after surgery and recorded one of the highest HSMR figures.

It blamed the result on the way it coded patients receiving palliative care following new national coding guidance.

“It was at the time of this change in recording practice that our HSMR started to rise,” the trust said in a statement and added that a review of the deaths had not identified any negative trends.

It has now reverted to the previous way of recording information and is expecting the HSMR to decrease as a result.

 

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